The architecture and design of Maggie's Dundee

Designed by world-famous architect Frank Gehry, and built in 2003, Maggie’s Dundee was the first new-build Maggie’s Centre. The white, cottage-like building with a wavy silver roof is modelled on a traditional Scottish “butt n’ ben” dwelling, and offers a welcoming sense of calm and sanctuary. 

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The garden

The garden, designed by Arabella Lenox-Boyd, contains a labyrinth design based on the one at Chartres Cathedral in France. The labyrinth is an allegory for life: It isn’t a maze, there are no dead ends, but you have to trust you will find a route through, even though often it feels like you are heading in completely the wrong direction. Also in the grounds of the Centre is a sculpture by acclaimed artist Anthony Gormley, entitled Another Time X. 

“My initial thought is how impressed I have been with the way in which the staff of the Maggie’s Centre and the Local NHS Authority have worked together to make this extraordinary project possible.  I am delighted to have been involved and hope that my garden gives pleasure and peace to all those who use it.  Maggie Keswick Jencks was herself a wonderful landscape designer and her original blueprint for the centres placed great emphasis on the role of the landscape and outdoor space in creating a relaxing environment with the emphasis on stress reduction and healing. I am delighted to have been involved in such a moving and worthwhile project, combining excellence in design with the best of the human spirit.” Arabella Lenox-Boyd

Frank Gehry is an international architect based in Los Angeles, and his famous designs include Bilbao’s Guggenheim Museum. 

Awards:

“Building of the Year”: Royal Fine Art Commission for Scotland
2004 RIAS Andrew Doolan Award for Architecture (Nominated)
2004 Sky Arts Building of the Year

 “I think it’s an inviting building, I think people will want to come inside and spend time there, and I really hope that in some small way it might contribute to a sense of rejuvenated vigour for moving forward and living life” 

Link to architect's website